Home      Log In      Contacts      FAQs      INSTICC Portal
 

Keynote Lectures

Capitalizing on Patient Reported Outcome Measures, Wearables, and Smartphones Towards Developing New Clinical Decision Support Tools for Frequent, Remote, Longitudinal Monitoring of Chronic Disorders
Athanasios Tsanas, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Psychological Perspectives and Challenges Towards Information Technology
Thomas Ostermann, Universität Witten/Herdecke, Germany

ETERNITY: European Training Network on Electromagnetic Risks in Medical Technology
Mireya Fernández Chimeno, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain

Democratizing Data-driven Healthcare
Tiago Guerreiro, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal

 

Capitalizing on Patient Reported Outcome Measures, Wearables, and Smartphones Towards Developing New Clinical Decision Support Tools for Frequent, Remote, Longitudinal Monitoring of Chronic Disorders

Athanasios Tsanas
University of Edinburgh
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Thanasis studied Engineering for his undergraduate and MSc degrees and completed a PhD in Applied Mathematics at the University of Oxford (2012). He continued working at the University of Oxford as a Research Fellow in Biomedical Engineering and Applied Mathematics (2012-2016), Stipendiary Lecturer in Engineering Science (2014-2016), and Lecturer in Statistical Research Methods (2016-2019); he joined the Usher Institute, Edinburgh Medical School, University of Edinburgh in January 2017 on a prestigious tenure-track Chancellor’s Fellowship. He secured tenure a year early, in December 2019, and was promoted to Associate Professor in Data Science (May 2020). Thanasis founded and leads the inter-disciplinary Data Analytics Research and Technology in Healthcare (DARTH) group (www.darth-group.com). He received the Andrew Goudie award (top PhD student across all disciplines, St. Cross, University of Oxford, 2011), the EPSRC Doctoral Prize award (2012), won the annual Physionet competition on 'Predicting mortality of ICU patients' (2012, as a key member of the Oxford biomedical engineering team) the young scientist award (MAVEBA, 2013), the EPSRC Statistics and Machine Learning award (2015), and won a ‘Best reviewer award’ from the IEEE Journal of Biomedical Health Informatics (2015). One of his research papers has been highlighted as a ‘key scientific article’ in Renewable Energy and Global Innovations, whilst some of his work has been covered in the media including Reuters. He leads the development and delivery of the 'Clinical Decision Support and Actionable Data Analytics' theme in the NHS Digital Academy, an innovative leadership programme in the UK which aims to annually train 100 CIOs and CCIOs and transform the NHS. He sits on the Editorial Boards of JMIR Mental Health and JMIR mHealth and uHealth. He is a Senior Member of IEEE, a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine.


Abstract
Chronic disorders strain national health systems worldwide, and require patients’ regular longitudinal monitoring to optimize treatment and decide on optimal interventions. In this talk, I will highlight and describe approaches we have developed to process a range of data modalities including patient reported outcome measures and passively collected data such as actigraphy, heart rate, and geolocation to monitor people with bipolar disorders, borderline personality disorders, post-traumatic stress disorders, and stroke. Collectively, these findings illustrate the potential of capitalizing increasingly available sensors and data along with smart algorithmic processing tools to develop novel, affordable, easy-to-use clinical decision support tools to improve patient care.



 

 

Psychological Perspectives and Challenges Towards Information Technology

Thomas Ostermann
Universität Witten/Herdecke
Germany
 

Brief Bio
Thomas Ostermann received his MSc in Mathematics and Physics in 1995 from the University of Osnabruck . After finalizing his doctoral degree at the Institute of Physiology, Witten/Herdecke University on Speech recognition he worked as Senior Methodologist at the Institute for Integrative Medicine at Witten/Herdecke University. In 2006 he received his PhD in „Health Services Research“  which in 2009 was extended for “Informatics, Medical Biometrics and Epidemiology”. In 2011 he became Professor for Research Methodology and Information Systems in Complementary Medicine and in 2015 he was appointed to the newly created Chair of Research Methodology and Statistics in Psychology. In 2016 he was elected as Head of the Department of Psychology and Psychotherapy. His research interests include the development and application of statistical methods for Health Services Research and Psychology, Research in Digital aspects of Creative Arts Therapies and the development of E-Health and M-Health applications. 


Abstract
Psychology is a quite young discipline in the field of medicine. Established from Wilhelm Wundt in the second half of the 19th century it very soon got its first contacts to information technology. This keynote outlines the relationship of psychology and information technology from the very beginning in the fields of clinical and educational applications and human interaction aspects and illustrates the current development towards a field of digital mental health. In particular, the use of Virtual Reality as a an approach in the treatment mental disorders and diseases such as Anxiety disorders or Parkinson’s disease, the therapeutic use of AVATARS in patients with auditory verbal hallucinations, the predictive power of digital drawing applications i.e. to detect Alzheimer’s disease, or the attitude to robots in the health care system are spotlights illustrating the growing interaction of these domains which are addressed in this keynote. But also critical questions on the impact of digitalization on human identity i.e. in child development, working environment or in the increased use of wearables and smart applications in leisure time fostering a need of quantification of life are touched.



 

 

ETERNITY: European Training Network on Electromagnetic Risks in Medical Technology

Mireya Fernández Chimeno
Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya
Spain
 

Brief Bio
Mireya Fernández Chimeno received a degree in Telecommunications Engineering, specialization in Electronics from the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya · BarcelonaTech (UPC), Spain, in 1990 and a PhD in Telecommunications Engineering in 1996 from the same University. Since 1998. She is an Associate Professor at the Department of Electronic Engineering of the UPC. She belongs to the Biomedical and Electronic Instrumentation Group, where he develops her research. She also belongs to GCEM, Grup of Electromagnetic Compatibility of the UPC from which she is the Quality Manager, and to the CREB, Center for Research of Biomedical Engineering of the UPC, both centers are part of the TECNIO network of the Generalitat de Catalunya. Mireya is also a member of the advisory board of Health and Sport Lab (www.healthsportlab.com), a spin-off created by the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) and the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya. Her fields of research interest are the design and development of biomedical instrumentation for medical and non-medical environments and the instrumentation design for electromagnetic compatibility measurements, focused on the development of near-field probes for medical, automotive and aerospace scenarios and on the evaluation of uncertainty of measurement methods. Mireya was a visiting researcher at the Department of Health Sciences, University of York, United Kingdom (2003), and deputy director of teaching laboratories at the School of Telecommunications Engineering (ETSETB), UPC (1996-2000). She was also councilor of the town of Gelida, Barcelona (2007 - 2011), where she was responsible for the fields of new technologies and citizen participation. She is co-author of more than 100 scientific and academic publications (articles, conference communications and books) and 7 patents. She is a member of the organizing committee of EMC Europe 2006 Barcelona, and EMC Europe 2019 Barcelona, Program Chair of Biodevices 2013, member of the Biodevices / Biostec program committee since 2013 and PhyCS since 2017.


Abstract
Electromagnetic interference (EMI), familiar to most people as the humming noise coming from a loudspeaker when receiving a mobile phone call, is becoming much more than a nuisance. In a hospital, high-tech medical equipment must operate in environments with heavy EMI. With the growing number of security critical devices communicating wirelessly, ensuring that the equipment are working properly is a growing concern. Nowhere is this truer than hospital settings. Highly complex interactions between devices are becoming the norm, therefore ensuring security requires that we start evaluating new equipment using a risk-based approach instead of the conventional rule-based approach, a method that is becoming increasingly inappropriate for hostile EMI environments. These new EMI scenarios need professionals capable of assessing EMI risk in many different situations. The purpose of the ETERNITY ETN is to train 14 Early Stage Researchers (ESRs) through a combination of research, doctoral schools, network events and secondments, in an international, interdisciplinary and intersectoral approach, enabling them to learn and develop as individuals who make a difference in an area of vital importance in terms of people's safety and well-being in an increasingly technologically complex world.



 

 

Democratizing Data-driven Healthcare

Tiago Guerreiro
Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa
Portugal
 

Brief Bio
Tiago Guerreiro is an Assistant Professor at Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, and a senior researcher at LASIGE. His main areas of expertise are Human-Computer Interaction, Interaction Design for Healthcare, and Accessible Computing. His research is focused on improving health and accessibility through technology, following a user- and data-driven approach, pillared by deploying and assessing technological artifacts in-the-wild. In these areas, he has published 75+ peer-reviewed papers. He received awards for 10+ papers, including at CHI, ASSETS, and MHCI, and an ACM Best of Computing award in 2016. He was the ASSETS 2020 General Chair, Web for All General and Program Chair, in 2016 and 2015, respectively, was Chair of the “Accessibility & Aging” Subcommittee for CHI 2019, among many other service roles. He is ACM Transactions on Accessible Computing Editor-in-Chief. He participated in 10+ EU projects (including an ongoing IMI project on digital endpoints for PD). He was an expert evaluator for H2020 EU PHC, EIT Health, CMU Portugal, and ERA ICPermed calls and was an invited expert supporting the European Commission in implementing the Web Accessibility Directive. He is the chair of Ciências's Ethics Review Board, the coordinator of LASIGE’s research line on Accessibility and Aging, and a member of the coordination board of the Data Science Master at Ciências.


Abstract
The advances in computing and sensing technologies, along with the capabilities to process and infer information from them, have not been accompanied by similar-paced developments on end-user tools. Scientific databases are filled with new possibilities for monitoring and predicting diseases, but clinicians (and patients) see slow and poor advances in what is provided for their practice and daily lives. In this talk, I will present the research we have been doing embedded in a clinical environment, co-designing usable technologies for immediate benefit, and to inform our next research steps. Alongside this, I will argue that this user-centered multidisciplinary effort makes both parts (technology and clinical) more equipped to discuss new designs and move research forward in a way that is grounded on experience. Lastly, I will present what we have learned from empowering clinicians with the tools to author their own data collection procedures, towards the democratization of digital healthcare. 



footer