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Keynote Lectures

Brain-inspired Medical Image Analysis for Computer-aided Diagnosis
Bart M. ter Haar Romeny, Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e), Netherlands

Designing for Somaesthetic Experiences - Focusing on Actuation Rather than Sensing?
Kristina Höök, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden

An Unobtrusive System to Measure, Assess, and Predict Cognitive Workload in Real-World Environments
Bethany Bracken, Charles River Analytics Inc., United States

Off-the-person ECG-based Biometric Recognition
Hugo Plácido da Silva, IT- Institute of Telecommunications, Portugal


 

Brain-inspired Medical Image Analysis for Computer-aided Diagnosis

Bart M. ter Haar Romeny
Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e)
Netherlands
 

Brief Bio
Bart M. ter Haar Romeny received the MSc degree in Applied Physics from Delft University of Technology in 1978, Ph.D. from Utrecht University in 1983 in biophysics. He became principal physicist of the Utrecht University Hospital Radiology Department. He was co-founder and associate professor at the Image Sciences Institute (ISI) of Utrecht University (1989-2001). From 2001, ter Haar Romeny holds the chair of Biomedical Image Analysis at the Department of Biomedical Engineering of Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands, and since 2011 is appointed distinguished professor at Northeastern University, Shenyang, China. He closely collaborates with Philips Healthcare and Philips Research, other industries and (national and international) hospitals and research groups. Currently he is project leader of the Sino-Dutch RetinaCheck project, a large screening project for early detection of diabetic retinopathy in Liaoning, China.


He authored an interactive tutorial book on multi-scale computer vision techniques, edited a book on non-linear diffusion theory in computer vision and is involved in (resp. initiated) a number of international collaborations on these subjects. He is author/co-author of over 200 refereed journal and conference papers, 12 books and book chapters, and holds 2 patents. He supervised 29 PhD students, of which 4 graduated cum laude, and over 140 Master students. He is senior member of IEEE, associate member of the Chinese Brainnetome consortium, visiting professor at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, member of the Governing Board of IAPR, Fellow of EAMBES, and chairman of the Dutch Society for Pattern Recognition and Image Processing.



Abstract
Discoveries on brain mechanisms have really taken off. Modern optical and new MRI technologies give insight in this spectacular organ, especially in the field of vision. Of mutual benefit are new developments in deep learning and neural network modeling, the mathematical understanding, and the availability of massively parallel computing power. The lecture will address a number of lessons to learn from the brain for medical computer-aided diagnosis, explain the mathematical intuition of a number of algorithms, and show some remarkable successes booked so far.



 

 

Designing for Somaesthetic Experiences - Focusing on Actuation Rather than Sensing?

Kristina Höök
Royal Institute of Technology
Sweden
 

Brief Bio
Kristina Höök is a professor in Interaction Design at the Royal Institute of Technology and also works part-time at SICS (Swedish Institute of Computer Science). She is the director of the Mobile Life centre. Höök has published numerous journal papers, books and book chapters, and conference papers in highly renowned venues. A frequent keynote speaker, she is known for her work on social navigation, seamfulness, mobile services, affective interaction and lately, designing for bodily engagement in interaction through somaesthetics. Her competence lies mainly in interaction design and user studies helping to form design.  She has obtained numerous national and international grants, awards, and fellowships including the Cor Baayen Fellowship by ERCIM (European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics), the INGVAR award and she is an ACM Distinguished Scientist. She has been listed as one of the 50 most influential IT-women in Sweden every year since 2008. She is an elected member of Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA).


Abstract
In designing for bodily experiences, there has been a lack of theories that can provide the underpinnings we need to understand and deepen our design thinking. Despite all the work we have seen on designing for embodiment, the actual corporeal, pulsating, live, felt body has been notably absent from both theory and practical work. At the same time, digital products have become an integral part of the fabric of everyday life, the pleasures (and pains) they give, their contribution to our social identity, or their general aesthetics are now core features of their design. We see more and more attempts to design explicitly for bodily experiences with digital technology, but it is a notably challenging design task.  With the advent of new technologies, such as biosensors worn on your body, interactive clothes, or wearable computers such as mobiles equipped with accelerometers, a whole space of possibilities for gesture-based, physical and body-based interaction is opened. How can we do a better job in interaction design involving our bodies? I will discuss how Shusterman’s theories of somaesthetics might provide some inspiration, and the need to focus on actuation rather than sensing.



 

 

An Unobtrusive System to Measure, Assess, and Predict Cognitive Workload in Real-World Environments

Bethany Bracken
Charles River Analytics Inc.
United States
 

Brief Bio
Dr. Bethany Bracken, is a Senior Scientist at Charles River Analytics. Throughout her career, Dr. Bracken has used a variety of behavioral, physiological, cognitive, molecular, and neuroimaging methodologies in both humans and animals to answer questions about the neurobiology of behavior. At Charles River, she currently works on projects using neurophysiological and physiological sensing methods to assess human states such as stress, focused attention, and cognitive workload and to predict upcoming performance deficits to allow time to enact augmentation strategies to optimize that performance. Dr. Bracken has a B.S. in Psychology from Clarion University of Pennsylvania, and a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Brandeis University. Before joining Charles River Analytics, Dr. Bracken completed a postdoctoral fellowship, quickly followed with a promotion to the faculty level, in the department of Psychiatry at McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School.


Abstract
Bethany Bracken, Noa Palmon, Seth Elkin-Frankston, Scott Irvin, Michael Jenkins & Michael Farry

Across many careers, individuals face alternating periods of high and low attention and cognitive workload, which can result in impaired cognitive functioning and can be detrimental to job performance. For example, some professions (e.g., fire fighters, emergency medical personnel, doctors and nurses working in an emergency room, pilots) require long periods of low workload (boredom), followed by sudden, high-tempo operations during which they may be required to respond to an emergency and perform at peak cognitive levels. Conversely, other professions (e.g., air traffic controllers, market investors in financial industries, analysts) require long periods of high workload and multitasking during which the addition of just one more task results in cognitive overload resulting in mistakes.An unobtrusive system to measure, assess, and predict cognitive workload could warn individuals, their teammates, or their supervisors when steps should be taken to augment cognitive readiness. In this talk I will describe an approach to this problem that we have found to be successful across work domains includes: (1) a suite of unobtrusive, field-ready neurophysiological, physiological, and behavioral sensors that are chosen to best suit the target environment; (2) custom algorithms and statistical techniques to process and time-align raw data originating from the sensor suite; (3) probabilistic and statistical models designed to interpret the data into the human state of interest (e.g., cognitive workload, attention, fatigue); (4) and machine-learning techniques to predict upcoming performance based on the current pattern of events, and (5) display of each piece of information depending on the needs of the target user who may or may not want to drill down into the functioning of the system to determine how conclusions about human state and performance are determined. I will then focus in on our experimental results from our custom functional near-infrared spectroscopy sensor, designed to operate in real-world environments to be worn comfortably (e.g., positioned into a baseball cap or a surgeon’s cap) to measure changes in brain blood oxygenation without adding burden to the individual being assessed.



 

 

Off-the-person ECG-based Biometric Recognition

Hugo Plácido da Silva
IT- Institute of Telecommunications
Portugal
 

Brief Bio

PhD in Electrical and Computers Engineering from the Instituto Superior Técnico (IST) – University of Lisbon, Hugo is a researcher at the IT - Instituto de Telecomunicações (https://www.it.pt/Members/Index/1293) since 2004. In 2012 he was a visiting researcher at the Computational and NeuroEngineering Laboratory (CNEL) from the University of Florida. He is co-founder of PLUX – Wireless Biosignals (http://www.plux.info), established in 2007 as an innovative technology-based company operating in the field of medical devices for healthcare and quality of life, where he is currently Chief Innovation Officer.

More recently, Hugo has been actively working towards making the world a bit more physiological, through BITalino (http://www.bitalino.com), an open source software and low-cost hardware toolkit, that allows anyone from students to professional app developers, to create cool projects and applications with physiological sensors.

His main interest interests include biosignal research, system engineering, signal processing, and pattern recognition, and his work has been distinguished with several academic and technical awards such as the 1st place at the Ordem dos Engenheiros Young Engineer Innovation Award in 2015 with the project “BIT: Biosignal Igniter Toolkit”, the 1st place at the Venture Day Lisbon in 2013 with the project “Vitalidi: Your Heart (h)as a Key!”, the selection as a semi-finalist to the Engadget Expand NY Inset Coin competition in 2013, the Life Sciences Award in 2010 at a yearly venture competition co-promoted by the MIT, and the "Caixa Geral de Depósitos Award'' from 2003 to 2005 for recognized academic merit.


Abstract
Electrocardiography (ECG) is an established standard medical practice and a mainstream diagnostic technique. Although the first practical implementations of devices for human use can be dated back to 1887, measurement methods are still mostly bound to hospital and short-time monitoring settings. However, the ECG has been used in other novel application domains, one of which being biometric recognition, where it has several convenient advantages to enhance existing modalities.

In this talk we will look into the state-of-the-art and future prospects enabled by what has been designated as "off-the-person" ECG sensing, focusing its use as a biometric modality, but describing also how it can lead to better cardiovascular disease management, especially in what concerns prevention and early detection.

By using sensors integrated in everyday use objects (e.g. a computer keyboard, a mobile phone, a PlayStation controller, or a TV remote control) rather than being attached to the body of the person, off-the-person ECG can pave the way for ECG data acquisition to become more pervasive and seamlessly integrated in multiple aspects of peoples everyday lives.



 



 


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